Three weeks ago we were knee deep in potato research and stumbled upon an historical dish called Potatoes Suzette. It was not practical for our purposes (we were feeding about 200 people) but filed the idea away for another day.

Today is the day.

Essentially, Potatoes Suzette are twice baked potatoes with a fancier name. If we can find out who Suzette is we'll let you know but a few treks across the internet were fruitless as to etymology.

After three test runs in the kitchen we crafted a fine version of this historic formula.

Ingredients

6 each Potatoes, Russet

8 oz Butter, Cow's, Unsalted

1/3 c. Cream, heavy

2 each Egg Yolks, Hen, Farm

1/4 c. Cheese (Queso Salvadorena or Parmigiano Reggiano)

Salt, Kosher

Pepper, Black, Coarse, Cracked

Method

* Bake potatoes for one hour at 375 degrees

* Split lengthwise, press ends toward one another til potato is slightly crimped

* Scoop flesh from potato, run through food mill or ricer, and place flesh in bowl

* Combine potato flesh, butter, cream, egg, cheese, salt and pepper, blend thoroughly

* Return potato mix to inside of potato skins

* Broil stuffed potatoes for 10 minutes til nicely browned

Voila! You now have the classic Potatoes Suzette

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If you can get your hands on some Anchovy Salt from Red Boat sprinkle that umami dust all over your concoction

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Etymology update from the Roadfood website:

"Suzette was a French housewife. She baked some potatoes for supper for her husband who was out working in the fields. He came home late......the potatoes were cold, so Suzette, being the ever resourceful French housewife.......cut them in half, scooped out the potato from the shell, mashed them with about 6 lbs. of French butter and as much cream, returned them to the shell and baked them under a blanket of gruyère cheese. But at the last minute she decided to make it really fancy-schmancy and pipe some potatoes into rosettes all along the sides. And voilà, the potato Suzette was born. Suzette had a lot of time on her hands. Poor Suzette. "