Food and Wine Somehow Manages To Screw Up The Fried Baloney Sandwich

A friend of ours has long maintained that all regions north of Cullman, Alabama are “yankee country” and best avoided. He’s an Alabama native and has strong opinions on the Deep South in general and southern food in particular.

Yes, he’s from Cullman.

He’d have a fit over Food and Wine opining on baloney or bologna as they charmingly refer to it.

To get to the Deep South from New Orleans you have to travel north for at least an hour. We love it down here and are always mystified when scribes from far-flung states with the word “North” in their title feel the need to chat up southern food.

Food and Wine writer Jenn Rice did just that in an article she penned earlier this year: Fried Bologna Sandwiches Are Everything America Needs Right Now.

It’s “baloney” by the way, and if you walk into a curb store or working man diner in the real south you’d better pronounce it correctly or you might get some rough business in the parking lot.

In the piece, Rice interviews seven “bologna” experts who discuss their favorite ways to serve the elemental blue collar sandwich.

Not one of them corrects the author on spelling or pronunciation. And most of them ‘fancy-up’ the sandwich to unrecognizability. We love our circulator, and sous vide is an excellent way to prepare meats but we leave it in the cupboard when it’s time to cook baloney (or mortadella for that matter).

Pepper jelly has no place on a fried baloney sandwich.

Fried baloney on a poppy seed bagel? Feed that chef to the gators out around Jefferson Davis Parish.

We don’t know who Cathy Rice Cantwell but she’s quoted in the piece as saying the proper baloney sandwich includes “fresh Sunbeam white bread and Duke’s Mayo.”

She’s the only clear thinker in the entire article .

We have a gold standard fried baloney sandwich recipe that sends eaters into pleasure convulsions link

Don’t over complicate it. All it takes to make a good fried baloney sandwich is the meat, white bread, mayo and a little sweet onion. Maybe a tomato if it’s the dead of summer.

And leave the multi-grain bread in the cabinet til your hippie cousin Windsong returns from her stint in Idaho at the Rainbow Gathering.

Behold the fried baloney po boy from Frady’s One Stop

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes:

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>